Upcoming events

    • 21 Oct 2021
    • 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
    • Online


    Maxwell Anderson ’77, president of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation talks with Professor of Creative Writing and English Kimberly Juanita Brown about the connections between social justice, inclusivity and art. Anderson has been recently featured in The New York Times for his influence on amplifying artists of color.

    AMPLIFYING STORIES THROUGH ART

    OCTOBER 21, 8 PM EST

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    Maxwell Anderson ’77

    Maxwell Anderson ’77

    Maxwell L. Anderson ’77 is an art historian and arts administrator who has devoted his career to advancing the mission of non-profit cultural institutions, while creating best practices to insure their development and sustainability. Anderson is the author of dozens of publications and his most recent book is Antiquities: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2016 and Tantor Media audiobook, 2019). His background in the field of antiquities includes seven years as a curator in the Department of Greek and Roman Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, teaching positions in the field of Roman art history at the University of Rome II, Princeton University, and Emory University, and nearly three decades as an art museum director. From 1987 to 2015, Anderson directed art museums in five North American cities: Atlanta, Toronto, New York, Indianapolis, and Dallas. Since 2016 he has served as president of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation and Community Partnership, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the work of African American artists from the South, and supporting their communities by fostering economic empowerment, racial and social justice, and educational advancement. Anderson received an A.B. from Dartmouth College with highest distinction in art history (1977), and A.M. (1978) and PhD. (1981) degrees in art history from Harvard University.


    Kimberly Juanita Brown

    Kimberly Juanita Brown

    Kimberly Juanita Brown is the Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth.  Her research and teaching gather at the intersection of African American/African diaspora literature and visual culture studies. In particular, she is interested in the relationship between visuality and black subjectivity. Her first book, The Repeating Body: Slavery's Visual Resonance in the Contemporary (Duke University Press, 2015) examines slavery's profound ocular construction and the presence and absence of seeing in relation to the plantation space. She is currently at work on her second book, tentatively titled "Mortevivum: Photography and the Politics of the Visual." This project examines images of the dead in the New York Times in 1994 from four overlapping geographies: South Africa, Rwanda, Sudan and Haiti. "Mortevivum" explores the relationship between photography and histories of antiblackness on the cusp of the twenty-first century.

    • 21 Oct 2021
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • online
    Register

    Join the DAASV Events Committee, and help us plan and execute events and activities in 2021. Plan an event that will attract the people you want to meet. Sharpen your event planning and project management skills with like-minded alumni. This is a great starting point for getting involved in your Club.


    • 22 Oct 2021
    • 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    • Online


    Unstructured Time:

    Finding Power in Strategically Stepping Away

    with Allison Holzer D'00


    With continued change and complexity, unstructured time is essential to both our wellbeing and performance.  Join Allison Holzer D'00, Co-CEO & Chief Innovation Officer of InspireCorps, to redefine how we think of inspiration as sustainable and unpack the powerful strategy of unstructured time. Drawing from original research, Allison will go deeper on her recent TEDxDartmouth talk, "Unpack the power of inspiration to shape your future" and guide participants to new and actionable insights.

    The neuroscience research backs this strategy and speaks to the benefits of unstructured time for thinking in an ever-distracted, ever-changing and multi-tasking world.Yet, many people still feel uncomfortable prioritizing it-- even guilty for taking time that doesn't have immediate productivity or concrete results attached to it.

    Friday, Oct 22 at 10AM Pacific/11AM MTN/12PM Central/1PM Eastern

     

    Drawing from her experience in leadership development and her knowledge in the fields of emotional intelligence and positive psychology, Allison will guide participants through a process to activate this powerful strategy to drive better performance and wellbeing.  join us for an interactive session that will include new ideas, actionable resources, lively discussion and powerful breakouts.

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    About Our Presenter

    Allison Holzer is the co-CEO and Chief Innovation Office of InspireCorps, an inspiration-based people strategy firm that partners with companies to unleash next-level performance for leaders, teams and organizations.  Their unique methodology is grounded in their original research on inspiring leadership and performance (published in their book Dare to Inspire and recent TEDx talk Unpack the Power of Inspiration to Shape Your Future) and uses their proprietary inspired performance leadership model and survey.

    She is a master certified coach and advisor who partners with leaders to drive stronger engagement, culture, and business results through innovative people strategy.  She draws from 20 years of expertise working with diverse and global leaders on unlocking new awareness and inspired performance for themselves and the organizations they lead.  

    Allison holds a B.A. in psychological brain sciences, with an emphasis on learning and cognition, from Dartmouth College and dual master's degrees in education and Fine Art from American University.

    Register Now

    • 28 Oct 2021
    • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
    • Online

    Electromagnetic Innovations to Save Human Lives

    Join Dartmouth Engineering professor Fridon Shubitidze and hear about recent outcomes in electromagnetic sensing (EMS) research. For over two decades Shubitidze and the EMS research group have been focused on real-world geophysical and medical applications to help save people's lives.

    Professor Shubitidze will showcase how two technologies, developed and built at Dartmouth, are remotely detecting and identifying dangerous subsurface unexploded ordnances, landmines, and improvised explosive devices; and how magnetic nano-particle (MNP) hyperthermia targets cancerous tumor cells.

    Thursday, October 28, 2021

    12:00 pm EST 

    Registration required to receive the Zoom webinar link and passcode.

    REGISTER NOW

    Fridon Shubitidze, Ph.D.

    Professor Fridon Shubitidze joined Dartmouth Engineering's faculty in 2007. His research is focused on computational electromagnetics, genome sequencing, magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment, and unexploded ordnance detection and discrimination.

    Shubitidze, a native of the Republic of Georgia, was awarded with the Medal of Honor by the country's President in 2019 for "his personal contribution in the development of science and in the creation of modern technologies." The award recognizes members of the Georgian diaspora for tehri work to advance human rights, democracy, sciences, or noble deeds.

    Shubitidze is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and earned his MS in radiophysics and his PhD in physical and mathematical sciences from Tbilisi State University in Georgia.

    • 29 Oct 2021
    • 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    • Online


    You know racism is real, and you want to end it, but how?

    Join us Friday October 29 to learn how.

    This is not a talk of antiracist theory but antiracist tactics--tactics that anyone, of any race, can use to strike a blow against injustice.  Antiracism is not about what we feel but what we do, and there are specific techniques we can use to create a just world.

    Antiracist strategies are skills that can be learned just as we learn skills for public speaking or hitting a baseball.  In this talk, you-- whether a person of color or white-- will find a playbook for leading your workplace, organization or community through transformative change in the wake of an act of explicit racism.  You'll learn to play antiracist rhetorical chess, and to anticipate and effectively respond to the discursive moves of people who don't understand bigotry, aren't aware of it, are in denial of it, or even actively uphold it-- so that you can advance justice goals.  You'll get a blueprint on how to dismantle systemic racism community by community, workplace by workplace, organization by organization-- and examples of what not to do.

    The talk is aimed at people who are conscious of the reality of racism and want to end it but may not know how.  The talk clearly shows how anyone can make an effective, significant, and measurable impact on racism through strategic action.

    FRIDAY, Oct 29 at 10AM Pacific/11AM MTN/12PM Central/1PM Eastern

     

    Register Now

    ABOUT OUR PRESENTER

    DartmouthShannon Prince D'09 is an attorney, legal commentator, and author of the forthcoming book "Tactics for Racial Justice: Building an Antiracist Organization and Community."  After graduating magna cum laude from Dartmouth Shannon earned her doctorate in African and African American Studies and her master's degree in English from Harvard Graduate School or Arts and Sciences as well as a law degree from Yale Law School.


    Shannon has drafted best practice language on policing policies for the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, represented plaintiffs in CCJEF v. Rell, a high-profile landmark education adequacy lawsuit, and is currently representing the Cherokee Nation in their lawsuit against pharmaceutical distributors and pharmacies for their role in the opioid crisis that the tribe is suffering.

    Besides the forthcoming book, her writing has been published in The Hill, Transition Magazine, Science, and Jezebel among other venues.

    Shannon is inspired by the multitude of ways Dartmouth women live out the principle of "vox clamantis in deserto," and hopes her workshop will empower them to speak and act on behalf of racial justice.

    Purchase Shannon's book at a discount using code FLY21.

    • 09 Nov 2021
    • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
    • Online


    Join current and former chairs of the Dartmouth Board of Trustees Liz Lempres ’83 Th’84Laurel Richie ’81, and Susan Dentzer ’77 for a conversation about pioneers, gender parity, and leadership as they reflect on the impact of the decision to admit women and the legacy of a half-century of women at Dartmouth.


    Register Now


    Questions? Contact dartmouth.alumni.relations@dartmouth.edu

    • 18 Nov 2021
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • online
    Register
    We are pleased to invite all dues-paying members to the DAASV Board Meeting.  We will discuss the Club's budget and activities plan for 2021, present committee reports, and hear the latest news from the Hanover plain.

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